Welcome to C++.org

The C++ programming language was designed and implemented by Bjarne Stroustrup.

"C++ (pronounced cee plus plus, /ˈsiː plʌs plʌs/) is a general-purpose programming language. It has imperative, object oriented and generic programming features, while also providing facilities for low-level memory manipulation." -- Wikipedia.org/c++

Why was it designed?

It was designed with a bias toward system programming and embedded, resource-constrained and large systems, with performance, efficiency and flexibility of use as its design highlights.[5] C++ has also been found useful in many other contexts, with key strengths being software infrastructure and resource-constrained applications,[5] including desktop applications, servers (e.g. e-commerceweb search or SQL servers), and performance-critical applications (e.g. telephone switches or space probes).[6] C++ is a compiled language, with implementations of it available on many platforms and provided by various organizations, including the Free Software Foundation (FSF's GCC)LLVMMicrosoftIntel and IBM.

How is it standardized?

C++ is standardized by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO), with the latest standard version ratified and published by ISO in December 2014 as ISO/IEC 14882:2014 (informally known as C++14).[7] The C++ programming language was initially standardized in 1998 as ISO/IEC 14882:1998, which was then amended by the C++03ISO/IEC 14882:2003, standard. The current C++14 standard supersedes these and C++11, with new features and an enlarged standard library. Before the initial standardization in 1998, C++ was developed by Bjarne Stroustrup at Bell Labs since 1979, as an extension of the C language as he wanted an efficient and flexible language similar to C, which also provided high-level features for program organization. The C++17 standard is due in 2017, with the draft largely implemented by some compilers already, and C++20 is the next planned standard thereafter.

Many other programming languages have been influenced by C++, including C#, D, Java, and newer versions of C (after 1998).